Donate Now |  Email Signup |  Media Login |  Members Login |  Search

Blog

View All

Arrow Arrow

Oct 11

DYNAMICS AND YOU

DYNAMICS AND YOU That ticking sound you hear, it sounds like when you've turned your car off and it's cooling down, right? Well, that is the players of the KSO collectively quenching, after an intense run of performances going back to September's Masterworks concerts. The Q Series, Unstaged, and Meet the Musicians slates were full, then the Chamber Classics season started up with a bang on Oct. 1. The Concertmaster and Friends recital at the KMA brought a new star into Knoxville's classical sky in William Shaub, and as if to dot the “ı,” the KSO performed John Williams' dynamic soundtrack to accompany the first Harry Potterfilm just this past weekend. I called the Williams score “dynamic,” which is a word that has many meanings in music. It can be a noun or an adjective. As an adjective, it means “vigorous,” “vivid,” or even “vibrant.” The noun version can refer to the “vibe” or the “chemistry” of the group-- e.g., group dynamics. Specific to music, however, the notation of volume at which a player or ensemble should play, the sizeof the sound, is called the “dynamics.” This is notated with the letters fand p,which are the abbreviations for the Italian words forte (loud) and piano(soft). Multiples of these letters indicate extremes; I have seen as many as five in either direction, but usually only up to two. After three it just gets to be kind of a joke; I mean, we don't have little dials that louden us decibel by decibel, we have pieces of wood and metal, operated by our breath and hands. An increase in volume is called a crescendo, and a decrease a diminuendo(or a decrescendo, they are synonymous). These words can also be replaced with symbols, elongated “>'s” or “<'s” with which the wider, the louder. The usual term for these signs is “hairpin;” I guess “tweezers” would sound a little weird, but it's exactly that shape. A crescendoover several measures will usually just employ the abbreviation cresc.,since the converging lines of the symbols would be visual pollution on the page. It's easy to overlook a 5 letter word in italics, however, so a player may boost his chances at correct execution by drawing a symbol in. Slide… This is the cello part to Beethoven's Violin Concerto, last movement. You can see on the second line down where every other note has a swell on it. In measure 150, a typical Beethoven feature is found; the “crescendo to nothing.” (Not all crescendos result in a f).In measure 158 notice the word dimin. printed, and you'll agree that the dynamic symbol, if used here, would get in the way of other musical indications. The effect of a composition's dynamics is dependent on each player's adherence to their parts' dynamic markings. A sudden (or subito) pianoin the midst of a fortephrase is a lot more embarrassing to miss than the other way around. A sharply attacked note might have the letters sfzor just sf on it; this stands for sforzando and means “with sudden emphasis.” A similar notation is fp,meaning fortepiano,which is just a loud start to a note rather than a sharp attack. The distinction between these two markings can be enigmatic. As if all this wasn't enough, let's throw in accents. They're little “>'s” on a single note, meaning yet another attack scenario. Whatever the indication, the uniformity and force of each players' attack on that note must be worked out precisely; one can't just blat or scrape indiscriminately. Slide… Here is the opening of Mahler's 4th Symphony. The whole spectrum of dynamic indications is here, as is typical with Mahler's persnickety (yet beautiful) music. Every measure has some sort of “diacritical marks”-- accents, accents under slurs, sforzandos, sforzandosunder slurs, fortepianos…All of these must be unified and coordinated across the orchestra-- this is why we rehearse.So if I said, “the ensemble's attention to dynamics made for an impressive group dynamic that resulted in a dynamic performance,” it appears that I have used the same word three times in one sentence, but I am really just pointing out that the word “dynamic” is a many-splendored thing.  

Read More

Oct 3

Concertmaster Series Sets Sail Again

The KSO's Concertmaster & Friends series has experienced a sea change, with a new captain at the helm.  Concertmaster William Shaub brings more youth and vigor to a series that was already pretty youthful and vigorous.  The series has always been a forum which combined virtuoso violin repertoire and staples of chamber music literature, and that will continue under Will's leadership.  The opening installments of the 2017-18 campaign will be this Wednesday and Thursday at 7:00, at the Knoxville Museum of Art.  The program will consist of works by Sarasate, Franck and Beethoven. Pablo Sarasate was a Spanish violin prodigy from the later 19th century whose considerable technical prowess and pure tone were complemented by a distinctly Spanish compositional style which motivated his contemporaries throughout Europe.  He was the first to translate Spanish melody, rhythm and soul into violin-ese, inspiring the composition of Saint-Saëns' Introduction and Rondo capriccioso and Lalo's Symphonie espagnole.  Will and pianist Kevin Class will perform Sarasate's Romanza Andaluza,from the “Spanish Dances” to open the program. The first half centerpiece will be César Franck's iconic Sonata for Violin and Piano from 1886.  A highly regarded organist, pianist and teacher, Belgian-born Franck's composing output was sparse until this work (and several that followed) put him on the map in a big way.  The four-movement Sonata was presented to the titanic Belgian violin virtuoso Eugène Ysaÿe as a wedding gift in September of 1886, and was performed at the wedding with a guest, Léontine Bordes-Pène playing the piano part.  The first public performance took place in a Brussels museum on December 16th of that year.  Somehow the concert ran long, and despite an official ban on artificial light at the museum, the two performers played the final three movements from memoryin the dark.  Will and Kevin will have no such predicament, I assure you.The concluding work will be Beethoven's Quartet in C Minor, Op. 18, No. 4.  It's the only minor-key quartet in the Op. 18 folio of 6 quartets, which were commissioned byPrince Joseph Franz Maximilian Lobkowitz(not to be confused with Lefkowitz!) of Bohemia.  Three of its movements are of an excitable, stormy nature, with only the Andante scherzoso quasi Allegrettostanding out with a quirky charm for comic relief.  

Read More

Sep 27

The Soul of Chamber Music in the Heart of Downtown

The chamber side of the KSO will be in evidence this week as the Principal String Quartet will present a concert at noon at the Square Room on Wednesday, Sept. 27, and the Knoxville Symphony Chamber Orchestra will bring a diverse program to the Bijou on Sunday afternoon at 2:30. The Square Room is on Knoxville's Market Square downtown, hence the name. It also happens to be square in shape, but most rooms are, so in this case, the venue is named after its location, not its design. The quartet will perform music of Mozart, Piazzolla and Mendelssohn. Mozart's quartet K. 159 is not your average “Baby Mozart” quartet; there is a quirkiness to it that indicates the composer's impatience with convention- with being square. The first movement Andante grazioso has a gentle start and is neither slow nor fast; a piece you might peg as a middle movement. Oddly sized phrases and differing textures keep you guessing as to the musical destination. The middle movement in this case is an urgently skittish Allegro. It has to be one of the best G minor movements ever written, on a list dominated by Mozart's “emo” gems. The finale is a Rondo, but you will probably want to call it a Theme and Variations. More punchy, boppy, B-flat major fun than you can shake a stick at, from a 14-year-old composer who was holed up in Milan working on his eighth opera. Astor Piazzolla took traditional string quartet playing for a wild ride in 1989 with his Four for Tango,written for the Kronos Quartet. Its highly percussive, urban complexion will set the table for Felix Mendelssohn's String Quartet op. 44, No. 2 in E minor. Mendelssohn's rich palette keeps the music bright and charming in spite of the minor tonality. The Sunday Chamber Classics series concert will begin in Revolutionary times, with Haydn's Symphony No. 60, the “Distraught” from 1775. Prokofiev's “Classical” Symphony will bridge the 140-year gap between itself and the Haydn by melding classical-era constructs with 20th-century tonal cheekiness. The concert will close with Maestro Aram Demirjian leading HK Gruber's Frankenstein!! This narrated showpiece from the Third Viennese School has every trick in the book coming in to play; “a show with everything but Yul Brynner,” as we used to say in the '80s. Gruber is said to be a distant relative of the composer of Silent Night, Franz Gruber, but that is where the similarity ends. This is music you will want to fasten your seatbelt for! Listen safely...

Read More

Sep 19

Knoxville's Classical Heritage

Opening night of the 2017-18 Masterworks series is at hand! As the season unfolds, the repertoire will resemble a travelogue, with the first concert's offerings appropriately enough delving into things Knoxvillean.  Acclaimed soprano Joelle Harvey will grace our stage for Samuel Barber's Knoxville: Summer of 1915,a work which has put our town on the map in the most positive way possible.  Preluding that performance, Knoxville's Poet Laureate R. B. Morris will read the text of the work, which is pulled from James Agee's Pulitzer-winning novel from 1959, A Death in the Family. The Agee connection will be evident again in Aaron Copland's Suite from his opera The Tender Land,which is inspired by Copland's brush with that author's Let Us Now Praise Famous Men.  No one does classical Americana better than Copland, and this luminous work contrasts beautifully with the Rachmaninov.  A commissioned work by Michael Schachter entitled Overture to Knoxvillewill open the concert.  Schachter's compositional style is somewhere between Copland's and Rachmaninov's; I will be curious to hear audience members' opinions as to how the work musically relates to our city.  A crew of brass instruments placed in various places in the the Theatre gives the piece a "surround-sound" ambiance that will take you away.The concert will close with Sergei Rachmaninov's final composition Symphonic Dances, a suite of three darkly vivacious movements brimming with Rachmaninov's orchestrating genius.  The Knoxville connection here is that the composer-pianist's last public recital took place at UT's Alumni Gym, just six weeks before his death.  The work means a lot to me because our son Thomas performed the two-piano version of the work at the Tennessee Governor's School for the Arts in 2006.  Luckily, Thomas will be in attendance at the Friday night concert.  Yay!This will all be Thursday and Friday night, at the Tennessee Theatre, 7:30 pm, tickets and info here. Please be aware of and bear with the various road closures in the immediate vicinity of the Tennessee; right now, it looks as though Clinch Ave. between State and Gay is closed to traffic, but the sidewalks are open.

Read More

Sep 14

Arts Educator Profile: teacher, violist, conductor Nina Mikos

Arts in Education week celebrates those making a difference through arts and music education in our community. Nina Mikos has been teaching in Maryville City Schools for 8 years and has been conducting with Knoxville Symphony Youth Orchestra for 4 years. She is most passionate about music education because it truly makes a difference in children's lives by fostering creativity, discipline, and social interaction.Ever since the moment I played my viola for the first time, music has been at the center of my life. I was very fortunate to have incredible orchestra directors and private teachers in my community. Growing up, I was involved in as many musical groups as I could be whether it was orchestra, choir, or piano. Music became my identity and my source of inspiration.As much as I have always enjoyed performing, I enjoy the human connection to music even more. The friends that I have made through music will last a lifetime. The students that I havetaught over the years have probably made a bigger impact on my life than I have on theirs. I started teaching private lessons when I was 15, and I have always felt strongly that to be a good performer, you have to be a good teacher, and to be a good teacher, you have to be a good performer. Because in the end, we are all working on the same skill sets and have the same drive to be successful. "As much as I have always enjoyed performing, I enjoy the human connection to music even more. The friends that I have made through music will last a lifetime. The students that I have taught over the years have probably made a bigger impact on my life than I have on theirs."Teaching has dramatically improved my playing, and performing has informed my teaching. I haveseen children grow in to young adults through the discipline, focus, and training that being in anorchestra gives them. I don’t believe in talent – I believe that every child can be successful in musicthrough hard work, persistence, and dedication. There’s always a “hook” to loving music for everychild. Some students thrive off of challenge, some love collaboration with peers, and others simplyenjoy the music-making process. But every child will continue if they feel successful. And it is myjob to make them successful from the very first note they play on their instrument.I am so fortunate to be a part of a vibrant musical community in Knoxville. I have 140students in my orchestra program (grades 5-7) at Montgomery Ridge Intermediate School inMaryville, I have the tremendous honor of conducting the Philharmonia Orchestra with Knoxville Symphony Youth Orchestra, and I also often play viola with the Knoxville Symphony. I feel blessed beyond words to be a part of this wonderful community with amazing friends and colleagues.This post was authored by the KSO Communications Dept.

Read More

Social

Twitter Feed

Fabulous time playing music on the #Masterworks stage once again. Bravo to all performers and… https://t.co/6b0H5LBx4jFri, October 20, 2017

Fabulous job by the @AppalachianBC dancers, we were thrilled to be joined by their talented troupe on the… https://t.co/Z9dzF4Y3QRThu, October 19, 2017

What a fabulous evening with the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra. Suite excerpts from Bizet's Carmen & Ravel's Bolero… https://t.co/7sI00Qwj1kThu, October 19, 2017

RT @AppalachianBC: A shot from rehearsal for 'Estancia' with the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra. A huge thank you to… https://t.co/6tBC38zNceThu, October 19, 2017

Happy birthday to Dr. Bill Snyder, music lover and honorary KSO board member! https://t.co/D7VWl6WvmRThu, October 19, 2017